Table of Content

Interview with Margay Leah Justice

 

Margay Leah Justice
Margay Leah Justice
Well you got to know more about Margay Leah Justice's first book in her Dante Chronicles called Nora's Soul in her guest blog on Friday, January 9th. Today you will be getting to know author who wrote the book in this following interview. I had fun asking Margay questions about her writing and herself especially since I loved her answers which gave me such insight into her and her writing. So enjoy the following interview between me and Margay.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Margay Leah Justice: I have always known that I wanted to write, in some capacity or another. In fact, I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t write. As to when I decided to write romance, I think the idea might have been born in my early readings of Jude Devereux. I just loved reading about her Montgomery men and wanted to write rollicking stories like that, too.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Margay: I started writing medieval novels in my teens (as stated above, I was really into Jude Devereux then), but kind of morphed into other historical periods (I have some ideas on the back burner in that regard—some in the Victorian era, one in the golden age of piracy and another set during the French and Indian wars) later on. Writing contemporary romances—and ultimately, paranormal—kind of snuck up on me. But it seems to be a comfortable fit because I have a lot of ideas brewing in this genre.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Margay: I think it was something about an Indian (American) princess. No, I don’t still have it, but it would be good for a laugh—I was only about twelve when I wrote it!


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and did it take you a long time to gather that research?


Margay: I’m funny about gathering research—I don’t just do it for a specific book. I am constantly bookmarking sites for research purposes or saving news clips that spark an idea. For me, research is a continual thing. But when I do it for a specific book, I try to be thorough. Sometimes, gathering research could take months.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your upcoming novel Nora’s Soul, which is the first in your Dante Chronicles series?


Margay: It literally came to me in a dream, well, two actually, that I had in one night. Even as I went from one dream to the other, I knew they were interconnected because the woman in them was the same. They were so completely different that they sparked a myriad of questions that had to be answered. Dream number one was of a woman—let’s call her Nora—who was in a nightclub, dancing the night away with a devilishly handsome man and when she tired and turned away from him, his eyes began to glow red and his appearance took on a devilish glow.

Why? I wondered. I had to find out. Well, before I could, Nora showed up in my next dream, dressed prim and proper, hair pulled into a severe bun, and she was moving into a garage apartment in preparation for caring for the twins of a widower. I was hooked at that point and had to tease out the story.


Phoebe: How many novels are you planning to write for this your series called The Dante Chronicles?


Margay: However many it takes for Dante to tell me his story! I think three at the least, possibly more. He is a larger than life character and has so much to say!


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Margay: I like to start with an outline so I have something I can look at to tease out the ideas. My outlines can be very detailed, including dialogue and bits of scenes—whatever comes to me while I’m sketching out the idea, I write in the outline. For me, this helps to conquer the dreaded blank page.


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Interview with Keta Diablo

 

Keta Diablo
Keta Diablo
Keta Diablo guest blogged here about her currently release Land of Falling Stars last Thursday, January 8th. As promised I've interviewed Keta about her writing and a bit about her personal life too for your enjoyment. Keta contacted me about reviewing one of her three erotic e-books (Land of the Falling Stars, Dust Moonlight and Decadent Deceptions) so she could get the word out to readers about her lovely erotic historical and paranormal eBooks. I was sad that I could only chose just one of her eBooks to review because they all sounded so good especially after I read the really HOT excerpts. But I had to so I chose Land of the Falling Stars to review and I will be reviewing it here on the blog very soon so keep a watch out for it soon. Now for the interview you will all enjoy:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Keta Diablo: Not until about seven years ago. Laura London books from the 80’s inspired me—a husband and wife team who wrote under a pseudonym and I loved their style. Its purple prose in today’s market and probably wouldn’t be accepted, but oh, so descriptive. Many times while reading (alone) I laughed until I was in tears. If a writer can transport you “there” they win the blue ribbon with me.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Keta: I began writing historical fiction (think Sara Donati the Wilderness series). And then branched out to romance and erotica.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Keta: The first series I wrote was under a pen name, historical fiction, and yes, I still have it, although the contract has run out. There has been some interest in this series, so who knows, you may see it again in 2009!


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and did it take you a long time to gather that research?


Keta: If it’s historical, a lot of research is involved, not so much for fantasy. Readers are very astute and will call you on historical inaccuracies. Whereas, with fantasy they are a wee bit more tolerant. In fantasy, authors can build a make-believe world and strange, alien creatures. It’s expected and readers will suspend their disbelief for fantasy.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel and release Land of Falling Stars?


Keta: I’m a huge Civil War buff. I came across an article about cousins who lived in Georgia, were best friends, and yet fought against one another in the war. That sent me on a path of thinking...what if two men loved the same woman, they were best friends and yet one fought for the North the other for the South? And what if, one killed the other accidentally in battle? These sub-plots conjured a bucket load of conflict and in romance, conflict is a must. The more the better.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concepts for your previous novels Dust and Moonlight and Decadent Deception?


Keta: Dust and Moonlight was my first fantasy. I had never written one before and some fellow authors asked me to write a short story for their anthology. Before it was released, the reviews were very positive. I pulled Dust and Moonlight from the anthology as soon as they found a replacement and lengthened it into a full length novel.

Decadent Deceptions was a novel I wrote for the 2008 Molly Contest (one of the top three contests in romance). I was thrilled to receive notification that I made the finals in the erotica category. After that, the story was placed quickly with Noble Romance.


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Interview with April Bostic

 

April Bostic
April Bostic
Today I will be interviewing a newly self-published author who I found through MySpace. April Bostic is the author of a romance novel called A Rose to the Fallen and I found out about April and her new book through a couple of MySpace Groups that we are both members of. I went to her official author website and found out about her and book, which really got my attention from the first couple of sentences she posted about it. On top of that I love the cover of the novel which is very lovely to look at. I will also have the honor of being the first to review her book here on my blog. So today I will be posting my interview with April which is her first interview but she did so great and I loved reading her answers to each questions. I will also be posting my review of her novel A Rose to the Fallen sometime this month so keep coming back to the blog to find out what I thought of her novel.

Phoebe Jordan: Which author inspired you to start writing?

April Bostic: An author never inspired me to write. I began writing because I wanted to challenge myself and see if I could do it. I also wanted to express the story ideas that were overflowing in my imagination. I still have many ideas that I have yet to write.


Phoebe: Did you experiment writing different types of writing genres?


April: As an adult, I’ve only written romance because that’s what I enjoy the most. I’m really not interested in writing a story in a different genre.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


April: I wrote short stories when I was a kid, but I no longer have them. As an adult, my first fiction was a Lord of the Rings fan-fiction. It’s actually on fanfiction.net.


Phoebe: How much research did you have to do for your novel and did it take you a long time to gather that research?


April: I did research on Brighton, England because there are some chapters that take place there. I also did research on British terms and phrases because I have British characters in the story and I wanted their dialogue to be authentic. I would say that it took a couple days total to gather the information I needed.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel and release A Rose for the Fallen?


April: The actor Toby Hemingway inspired me to write the story initially. But I decided to make the story about a young woman meeting a fallen angel because I wanted to write a modern-day story that could be believable. There are people out there who really believe in angels and I wanted to introduce the idea that perhaps they do exist, but they’re in disguise. I also wanted to introduce the idea that perhaps soul mates really exist as well. A Rose to the Fallen was my spin on the concept and how I believe the love can be between two people who are soul mates through sharing a single soul.


Phoebe: Do you have any plans for writing anymore novels like A Rose for the Fallen in the future?


April: No, I don’t plan on writing anymore novels in the future.


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Interview with Jessica Coulter Smith

 

Jessica Coulter Smith
Jessica Coulter Smith
Well I've got an interesting interview here today named Jessica Coulter Smith, who was a guest blogger this past Tuesday here on the blog. I met her on Facebook when she joined my group Romance Readers and Writers and started posting on one of the threads I had on there asking me about the books I've read and reviewed. Well I she posted a bit about her current release and I got interested about it so I went to her website and found out more about her werewolf series. I was really intrigued with the blurb on her website and left a comment about being interested in reviewing it on my blog in her guestbook.

So later she contacted me and asked me if I really was interesting in reading and reviewing her novel and I of course sent her message back that said yes. I also asked her if she would be interested in being a guest blogger here on the blog as well as having me interview her here on the blog as well. She was delighted about it and here she is answering my interview questions about her and her writing romance novels. I have finished reading and have reviewed her novel Moonlight Protector, the first novel in her Ashton Grove Werewolves series, so check it out. Now here is my interview with Jessica:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Jessica Coulter Smith: I actually didn’t know. I love to read paranormal romance and picked up Katie MacAlister’s YA series one day. I noticed at the back of the book that Smooch YA was taking open submissions. I had been writing off and on since high school and thought “why not?” and decided to check it out. Turns out that writing a YA romance was really hard for me; I had problems leaving out the sex scenes. *grin* So what I had begun as a YA book, I turned it into Whispering Lake.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Jessica: I’ve always been into paranormal stuff—not just romance either! I love Stephen King movies and started reading Anne Rice in middle school. So I was pretty much set on writing paranormal romance from the beginning. Occasionally I’ll write a contemporary romance short story to give out for free, but those are actually harder for me to write.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Jessica: My first un-published fiction novel was never completed. I started it in about 8th or 9th grade and dabbled with it off and on into my early twenties. Honestly, I have no clue where the disk is (the fact that it’s on a disk dates me, lol). However, if I run across it in a box one day, I plan on pulling the file from it and seeing if I can finish the story—if not for publication, at least for myself. I hate leaving things half way done.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Jessica: I tend to write about things I’m already familiar with so there isn’t much research involved. Now if I were to write a historical romance, I’d probably have to move in to the library for at least a year. While any author has my respect, those who write historical really have my respect. I don’t see how they do it!


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel Moonlight Protector, which is part of your new Ashton Grove Werewolves series?


Jessica: Actually, Moonlight Protector is a spin-off from my first novel, Whispering Lake. Cole played a pretty major part in Whispering Lake, but he didn’t get his HEA. When I finished the book, I realized that I wasn’t done with Cole yet. I sat down and just started playing with some ideas and eventually Moonlight Protector was born.



Phoebe: How many more novels do you have planned to write for your new Ashton Grove Werewolves series?


Jessica: Good question. The series has a tendency to evolve a little more with each book. Originally, I had only planned on writing a trilogy to make sure my three scrumptious werewolves were taken care of. However, along the way I drug their cousins and some friends into the mix. At the moment, I’m looking at a 6 part series, but that could change as the last two books are still a little fuzzy at this point.


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Interview with Alyson Noël

 

Alyson Noël
Alyson Noël
I found out about Alyson Noël through the amazing website/blog called Free Book Friday that is founded by author Jessica Brody. I'm so glad that I read and even heard the wonderful podcast interview of Jessica and Alyson talking about her first adult novel, Fly me to the Moon and two of her recent released young adult novels Saving Zoë and Cruel Summer. I also recommend that you all listen to it also so you can decide for yourselves if you agree with me about Alyson Noël's experience in writing and adult novel after only writing young adult novels. She recently released a new young adult novel called Evermore, which is the first book in her Immortals series and has hit the New York Times Bestseller list and even had gone into second printing because the first printing sold out. Well I was lucky enough to get to interview Alyson Noël right here on my blog today and you should watch out because soon I will be reviewing some of her novels both adult novel and young adult novels as well.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing young adult was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing young adult?

Alyson Noël: When I read Judy Blume’s, ARE YOU THERE GOD? IT’S ME, MARGARET, in sixth grade, my life my life was forever changed! I’d always been an avid reader, having a mom who introduced me to the magic of books early on, but Judy Blume’s were the first that I could directly really relate to—they felt like they were written for me and my friends and all that we were going through. And from the moment I closed the cover I knew I wanted to be a writer too.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of young adult novels you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Alyson: My debut novel, FAKING 19, was the first book I’d ever written. It started as a short story for a writing class I took years ago that I’d always planned to expand into a novel—though many years passed before I finally sat down and did that! I didn’t really try any other genres or stories—I wasn’t planning that far ahead. I didn’t even think of it as YA until I got an agent and it was ready to be sold!


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Alyson: I used to write short stories for my high school AP English class that I’d turn in instead of the actual essays my teacher assigned (kids, don’t try this at home unless your teacher is Mr. Sawaya, then feel free!). And though I haven’t looked at them for years, I’ve got a feeling they’re packed away in a closet somewhere…


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Alyson: I love research—it’s one of my favorite things! How long it takes depends both on the book and how long I allow myself to procrastinate! Though with EVERMORE being a paranormal, it required far more research than any of my previous books. I spent the last two years reading books on psychics, near death experiences, ghosts—you name it. I even took a three-day psychic development seminar with world-renowned medium James Van Praagh, and underwent hypnosis in a past-life regression with best-selling author, Dr. Brian Weiss—both of which were completely fascinating experiences!


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest young adult novel Evermore, which is part of your new Immortals series?


Alyson: Well, a few years ago I lost three people I loved in five horrible months, and just when the dust began to settle, my husband was diagnosed with leukemia and it felt like my entire world was crashing down. A year later, when he was in full remission, I wrote SAVING ZOE and CRUEL SUMMER, both of which explore the subject of grief and unavoidable change. But when it came time to write my next book, I realized I wasn’t finished exploring those themes though I wanted to do so in a much different way, by giving the story a paranormal twist and pushing the boundaries between life and death, and EVERMORE just came pouring out of me.


Phoebe: How many more novels to you have planned to write for your new Immortals series?


Alyson: I recently agreed to write three more books, bringing the series to a total of five! The next book, BLUE MOON, comes out on 08.04.09, and three more titles will follow in 2010.


Phoebe: You’ve written one adult novel called Fly Me to the Moon, do you plan to write any more adult novels in the future?

Alyson: I’d love to! Writing FLY ME TO THE MOON was an absolute blast! But at the moment, I’m keeping very busy with the YA stuff, so all my adult ideas are on the back burner for now.


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Interview with Karen Anders

 

Karen Anders
Karen Anders
Today I will be interviewing Harlequin Blaze romance author Karen Anders. She contacted me about scheduling an author interview, author guest blog as well as a book review of her upcoming release for Harlequin Blaze. I recently finished reading her upcoming March 2009 Harlequin Blaze novel called Up Close and Dangerously Sexy and will be posting my review for it tomorrow. I had fun reading it and I was so happy to have the opportunity to interview her as well as having her guest blogging this Thursday as well. I learned a lot about Karen's writing process and how she got into writing romance and I hope that you all have fun reading this interview. Leave your comments as well as questions to this post because Karen will be checking in throughout the day to answer them.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Karen Anders: I’m not sure that I’ve ever thought of it that way. I knew that I loved to read. It was and is still my greatest passion. Spinning out the stories I discovered I had in my head just came naturally and once I started, I didn’t want to stop. So I guess the first time I realized that this was my talent, my passion was when I got my first book, Jennifer’s Outlaw, published by Silhouette. The author that most influenced me is Nora Roberts. Her stories are so amazing. Of course, I wanted to be her when I grew up. But, now I understand who I am and what I enjoy writing.

Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Karen: I discovered romance in my teens and fell in love with it. I read it in many genres: Historical: Shanna by Kathleen Woodiwiss, The Shadow and the Star by Laura Kinsale. Science fiction: Star Commandos by P.M. Griffin, Startide Rising by David Brin. Fantasy: The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia McKillip, Gandalara Series by Randall Garrett and Vicki Ann Heydron. Gothic: Kirkland Revels by Victoria Holt, The Black Swan by Phyllis A. Whitney. Suspense: A Coral Kiss by Jayne Ann Krentz, Hot Ice by Nora Roberts. With all these books I read, especially the gothic and suspense books, I discovered a taste for action/adventure and after looking in vain for what I wanted to read, I decided to start writing it myself. I was always interested in romance mixed with danger. So my first book was a historical about a young woman who goes into the desert and it was bad. I also found that researching a historical book just wasn’t my cup of tea. Then I discovered contemporaries. My first book was about 500 pages and got me the interest of an agent. From there I got published by Silhouette.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Karen: As I mentioned, the first book I ever wrote was about a young miss and a desert sheik that was inspired by the book my grandmother gave to me when I was sixteen, The Sheik. It took me ten years to finish that book. But, I’m afraid as my first attempt, it was quite bad. I destroyed that book at the end of the eighties and gave it a fitting burial.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and did it take you a long time to gather that research?


Karen: I do a lot of research on every aspect of my novels. First, I do up front research when I’m fleshing out an idea. I explore different avenues to make my story richer. Then as I’m writing the book, I do ongoing research to go into more depth and to make the story as real as possible.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concepts for some of your upcoming novels?


Karen: Up Close and Dangerously Sexy starts my Undercover Lovers Miniseries. For the second book, I decided to create a brother for my twins. I sandwiched his book in between theirs. In this series I have a villain called The Ghost and he runs through all three books to tie them together.


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Interview with Lisa Lane

 

Lisa Lane
Lisa Lane
Well yesterday I reviewed Lisa Lane's novel Lust in Space, which is a sci-fi/erotic romance novel that is published by Ravenous Romance. Lisa Lane heard about me through erotic romance author Keta Diablo who recommended me to Lisa if she wanted to have her Sci-fi/erotic romance novel reviewed. When I got the e-mail I went to Ravenous Romance to find out more about her novel Lust in Space. I found the blurb for the book very intriguing so I e-mailed Lisa back and we worked out that I would review the novel as well as having an author interview and author guest blog as well. So come back again because the author guest blog will be up this Thursday.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Lisa Lane: I’ve known since I was about seven or eight that I was a writer, my early influences being sci-fi, literary, and horror. It wasn’t until just a few years ago that I realized how much I also enjoyed writing romance. Sherrilyn Kenyon’s Dark Hunter series was a great inspiration, but I have to admit that my main romance influences are actually more erotic; Anne Rice, Olaf Stapeldon, and Anais Nin are my favorites.

Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Lisa: I have experimented a lot with my romance, trying just about everything from sweet and romantic, to exotic and kinky. Anyone who has read any of my work—literary, horror, and romance—knows that I love to mix genres, and I love to test my limits, as a writer. For that reason, I don’t think that I can choose just one genre. I’m still experimenting.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Lisa: My first fiction was a “novel” I wrote when I was eight. It was a heart-wrenching story about a good witch and her cat. I felt the twelve-page behemoth was worthy of a hardbound cover, and so I gave it one, complete with a crayon-drawn picture. I wrote my first serious work of fiction when I was fourteen or fifteen. My twin sister and I co-authored a romantic horror novel, The Nightcrawlers, and the summer we wrote it was probably one of the best summers of my childhood. Sadly, the manuscript and disks got lost in a move, many years ago.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Lisa: That depends. The longest I have ever spent researching on a subject was eight or nine months, for a screenplay I wrote about a man infected with rabies. This was about fifteen years ago, when I didn’t have the Internet, so I spent a lot of time at my local library. I had no idea that there was so much to learn about the effects of rabies on human beings….

My most recent research has been for a character featured in the third installment of The Darkness and the Night series. He’s a varsity football player, and although I know a decent amount about the mechanics of the game, I needed to know the dynamics of being a player. I interviewed the vice-president of a professional football team for all of the details, and then used a few quick web searches to fill in the blanks. In all, it took me a couple of months, but I think it will make a big difference in the depth and believability of the character.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel, Lust in Space?


Lisa: Ravenous Romance had sent out a call for submissions, noting that they were looking for numerous types of stories, one being a “Star-Trek”-inspired romance. I had always wanted to write an episode for my favorite “Star-Trek” series but I hadn’t felt confident enough at the thought of altering, personally, a universe I loved so much, ever to pursue it. When I saw the chance to create my own universe in the genre, I knew I needed to jump on it. I brainstormed over the next day or two, and then sent in my ideas for characters and storylines, ecstatic with what the muses presented. I gave my characters diverse personas, mixing and matching traits of various favorite space-themed characters, while working to make the cast unique, likeable, and real.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel, Blood and Coffee, which is the first book of your The Darkness and the Night series?


Lisa: Blood and Coffee is The Nightcrawlers’ legacy. After having spent a couple of years writing literary science fiction, I decided it was time I wrote a good horror. With my sister’s permission, I scrapped most of the original storyline, keeping only the basic elements, and brought Karen, Billy, and the gang back to life. The Nightcrawlers was reborn as The Darkness and the Night: Book One. Lori Perkins, the lead editor for Ravenous Romance, came up with the fantastic subtitle, Blood and Coffee.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your upcoming novel, Cosmic Orgasm, which is the second book of your The Darkness and the Night series?


Lisa: I knew I couldn’t just leave my readers hanging with Blood and Coffee’s bittersweet ending, but I knew that I didn’t want to follow the typical formula, either. I had a number of characters from Blood and Coffee that I knew needed some attention, and I knew that I wanted to include at least one of them in one of my plot twists. I decided that Karen needed a new love interest, but I needed a way to detach her from Billy. I also knew that I wanted Karen to begin to develop her abilities as a vampire, and move one step closer toward the normalcy she so desperately seeks. The idea of giving John-Michael bounty hunters seemed to fit, and the Astral hell Karen falls into felt like the right solution to all of my other problems.


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Interview with Tamela Quijas

 

Tamela Quijas
Tamela Quijas
Today I will be interviewing romance author Tamela Quijas here on the blog. She contacted me to review her latest novel Angel's Fire, Demon's Blood as well as to set up an author interview and author guest blog. The author guest blog is going to be posted this Thursday, March 12 and when I've finished Angel's Fire, Demon's Blood I will be posting the review soon. Now onto my interview with romance author Tamela Quijas.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Tamela Quijas: I wanted to write romance at a young age, somewhere after realizing I would probably never be recognized as the next great Burroughs or Verne. Johanna Lindsey's Captive Bride inspired me to begin writing romances.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you? I'm still experimenting.


Tamela: Basically, it's whatever should happen to strike my fancy. (Although I am partial to a really compelling paranormal)


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Tamela: Querida was the very first romance novel I wrote back in the early eighties. Yes, I still have it in a box (all hand typed) and I am currently editing and getting it ready to submit to a publisher.



Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Tamela: Weeks. I'm one of those people that truly enjoys research and the ability to find it so quickly on the internet.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel Angel’s Fire, Demon’s Blood?


Tamela: I have a bunch of teenagers that insist I watch the latest music videos. There was one song that grabbed my attention and, before the song had finished, I had the entire story playing out in my head.


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Tamela: My beginnings are always rather intense. I spend the most time trying to pull the reader in, just as I have been pulled into telling the story. I will spend weeks with notes (pages and pages) jotted all over the place and I will bounce numerous ideas off of my daughters.


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Interview with MaryLu Tyndall

 

MaryLu Tyndall
MaryLu Tyndall
MaryLu Tyndall is a Christian Romance author that I got in touch with through Christian Romance author Linore Rose Burkard after I reviewed her novel Before the Season Ends. She contacted me about a possible book review, author interview and author guest blog. After I checked out her website to know more about her current released novel The Red Siren, I got back to her and we set up for an author interview for today and an author guest blog for Thursday, March 19 and for a book review that will be posted here soon. Now enjoy my interview with Christian Romance author MaryLu Tyndall.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing Christian romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

MaryLu Tyndall: Not until I got my first contract! I always loved writing, but I wrote mostly as a hobby until 2003 when I felt a strong desire to write a pirate story, but not just any pirate story, a tale about a Christian Pirate. I finished my very first manuscript and then went in search of a publisher, knowing full well that the chances of getting publisher were very slim. But doors kept opening for me wherever I went, and I received a contract for a 3 book series just a few months after my agent sent the manuscript out to publishers. That’s when I first realized that maybe, just maybe, God’s plan for me was to write Christian novels.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of Christian romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


MaryLu: I’ve always loved historicals, so it was a no-brainer for me which genre I wanted to write. I love being swept away to another time and place where men were strong and brave and women didn’t mind being cherished and protected. I think in our modern age, we’ve lost so much of the lure, the attraction between the genders that goes beyond the physical. Our roles have become so blended and confused that it’s hard to tell who’s who from their behavior.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


MaryLu: I “attempted” to write a historical romance about twenty years ago called Out of Time. I never completed it but did submit the first three chapters to AVON and was flatly rejected. At the time I was a single mother who worked full time and I didn’t have much confidence in myself so I gave up. I burned the manuscript, and I’m glad I did. It was truly horrible!


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


MaryLu: I do quite a bit of research for each novel—probably close to a couple of weeks to a month full time before I even begin writing. And then the research continues while I’m writing as small details arise that I need to investigate. I use a variety of research tools: good old fashioned books from the library, online websites, museums, and on-site research. For my Charleston series, I spent a week in downtown historic Charleston taking all the tours and visiting the museums, etc...


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your current novel, The Red Siren, which is the first in your new Charles Towne Belles series?


MaryLu: In my research for pirates, I came across various stories, fact and fiction, about women pirates. The idea intrigued me so much that I decided to create a story around one who roamed the Carolina seas. In the early years of Charleston, SC, the port city was ravaged over and over again by pirates, so my tale fit right into the time period. But being a Christian novel, I had to give my lady pirate a good reason to be doing what she’s doing, and I couldn’t make her as violent as some of the lady pirates I read about. (Some were worse than the men!)


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your upcoming August 2009 novel, The Blue Enchantress, which is the second in your new Charles Towne Belles series?


MaryLu: The Blue Enchantress is the story of the sister of the lady pirate in The Red Siren. There are three books in the series and three sisters, each representing one of the seeds sown in the parable of the sower found in Matthew 13. This story is about Hope Westcott, a beautiful woman who thinks her only value is found in her appearance and who throws herself shamelessly at any man who will give her the love and attention she craves. But her plans go awry when her latest lover abandons her to be sold as a white slave on the island of St. Kitts in the Caribbean.


Phoebe: How many more novels do you have planned to write for your new Charles Towne Belles series?


MaryLu: At this time only 3, but the stories lend themselves to further sequels.


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Interview with Tawny Weber

 

Tawny Weber
Tawny Weber
Today I have the wonderful Harlequin Blaze romance author Tawny Weber being interviewed here on the blog. I was lucky enough to have Tawny get in touch with me for an author interview, author guest blog and two book reviews for her April 2009 and May 2009 Harlequin Blaze releases. The first guest blog for her April 2009 release, Coming on Strong, will be Thursday, March 26 and the second guest blog for her May 2009 release, Going Down Hard, will be posted at the end of April. I will be reviewing Coming on Strong soon and watch out for my review of Going Down Hard in April. Now for my interview with Tawny Weber!

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Tawny Weber: I’ve always loved reading romance and used to wish I could write. But it never occurred to me to actually try until 2001 when my husband and I were playing “if you could do anything” and I said if I could do anything, I’d be a romance author. He asked why I wasn’t trying and it just went from there. *grin*


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Tawny: I knew I wanted to write in for either Harlequin Temptation or to write romantic comedy paranormal. I tried both, but found that I had a better feel for writing my Temptation hopefuls. But then the line closed and I shifted focus to Blaze which is where I sold my first book.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Tawny: The first fiction story I ever completed was called Sweet Indulgence. It’s sitting on my hard drive. *grin*


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Tawny: I don’t do a lot of research for my books. They are all contemporary, usually set in familiar places. I’ll do some research into careers or particulars that the story needs as it comes up.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your upcoming April 2009 Harlequin Blaze novel Coming on Strong?


Tawny: I wanted to do a runaway bride story with a twist and thought it would be fun to turn the typical “married because he wants sex and she won’t go for it without a ring” on its ear by having HER be the one who’d wanted the fling and him holding onto his virtue until he got a wedding ring. I added a luxury resort aimed at the rich and famous trying to avoid the paparazzi and ta-da—I had the premise.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your upcoming May 2009 Harlequin Blaze novel Going Down Hard?


Tawny: I came up with the premise for Going Down Hard while writing Coming On Strong. After getting to know the characters in Belle and Mitch’s story, I wanted to do a body guard story. Sierra and Reece met in Coming On Strong and both were such strong, independent characters who basically got turned on by challenging each other. I also wanted to tie it in to a degree one of the minor threads in Coming On Strong, the paparazzi angle of being stalked via photos.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Tawny: Hmm, confession time. Belle and Sierra are named after my dogs. *grin* What can I say, I love the names. As for characters, I do start with a premise and can pretty easily imagine up character types that would fit that premise. But then developing the types into actual characters takes me much longer. I will write and rewrite the first three chapters until I know the characters and what drives them—their fears and issues and where those issues came from. Once I’ve got that, the rest of the story comes together pretty quickly.


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Tawny: Painfully? *grin* I start with a premise and write an outline—a long synopsis. I send it to my editor and once she green lights it, I start writing. I’ll spend as long writing and rewriting the first three chapters as I will the entire rest of the book. Once those chapters are written, I know my characters and their motivations—as well as have a lot of ideas for scenes that will drive the story. I tweak my outline to fit, note any scene ideas I came up with and then dive in to finish the book. In the beginning, I’ll get maybe 3 pages a day. Once I’ve got the partial finished, I’ll average 8-10 and in the last few chapters I’m usually at 12-15 a day.


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Interview with Lori Perkins

 

Lori Perkins (Avatar)
Lori Perkins (Avatar)
Today I have a wonderfully special guest being interviewed here on the blog today. Lori Perkins, the co-founder of Ravenous Romance talks about her career as a literary agent and then branching off into opening an e-publishing company. I've read a couple of books by Ravenous Romance authors such as Keta Diablo, Lisa Lane and Elle Amery and they won't be my last. I have recently been helping out the Ravenous Romance authors create a wonderful blog for them to promote their blogs so you have to check out Ravenous Romance Authors blog.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that going into the literary business was the career for you? How did you choose who to represent as a literary agent?


Lori Perkins: I have a journalism degree from NYU and had started a newspaper in upper Manhattan. Since I couldn’t pay my authors that much, I was always telling them where to sell their articles. One of them told me I was like their agent. Then my editor left to work for an agent, and he said I would make a great agent. An opportunity came to work in an agency, and I went for it. I hated the sleazy guy I worked for, but I loved the work, and I sold a book in auction right away. The editor called and invited me to meet with him. I spent hours sorting through my closet looking for the right clothes to wear (he was the V.P. of a big company), but when I got to his office, he informed me we weren’t going to lunch. He told me I was working for a man with a bad reputation, that I was a good agent, and that I should quit as soon as I got back to the office. Which I did. I got a job with another agent, who taught me everything I know, but she was a screamer, and I hated being yelled at, so I set up my own business after 3 years of training. I love getting new writers into print. I see being an agent as an extension of my editor training. I like to think of myself as a writer’s fairy godmother, making dreams come true.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of genre writers you wanted to represent? Did that change over the years?


Lori: I started out representing investigative reporters, and I thought I would find the great American novel of my generation. But I soon learned that journalists felt that they owned their story (and were therefore terrible to edit) and that literary fiction was a genre just like romance or science fiction.

One day, my boss asked if anyone had ever read any of these books by Stephen King, and I confessed that I had read every one (and realized that I often lied when asked what I was reading, “Oh, the new Roth or Updike,” I’d say, when I was actually reading the new King or Rice or Koontz). She said, (and this is a quote), “Poof. You’re the new horror agent.” As soon as she gave me permission to represent horror (which really was one of my passions), I went into the back room where we stored the piles of unsolicited, and found four horror first novels. I sold them all within a month. And a horror agent was born. I helped start Horror Writers of America with Charlie Grant on the east coast and Dean Koontz on the west coast. I have sold more than 200 vampire novels. So that’s how I became an agent of science fiction, fantasy and horror. I ended up dropping all my investigative journalists, but representing the feature writers (who wrote about music, art, theatre, TV), because they could meet deadlines and didn’t feel they owned their stories, and that’s how I became an agent of popular culture.


Because I repped popular culture, I was approached by the adult entertainment industry, and ended up representing a number of those books (I’m Jenna Jameson’s agent). They told two friends and they told two friends, and before I knew it, I was up to my elbows in porn. But I wanted to do more fiction, so I was wondering if I could use this new clout in the erotica and romance market. I started reading erotica and erotic romance, and found some very talented female authors who were writing incredible stuff. I took them on, and sold all of them to the majors—Harlequin, Avon, Bantam, etc. They could write a book a month, but the major New York publishers only wanted a book a year or every year and a half. I looked into the e-pub market and realized there was a tremendous audience for this material, some of whom were already reading online.


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Interview with Genella deGray

 

Genella deGray
Genella deGray
Today I have newly published romance author Genella deGrey on the blog with an interview and she will be back on Thursday with an author guest blog. Her first published novel Remember Me is going to be out on April 21st from Freya's Bower so mark that day on your calendars.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Genella deGrey: Within one year of reading my first romance novel (Judith McNaught's Until You) I had exhausted every historical in my dear friend Cyndi's huge collection. (I was unable to purchase my own books: a. because I had no allowance and, b. my former [he who must not be named] frowned upon romance novels.) When Cyndi handed me Remembrance by Jude Deveraux, I admit, I was skeptical because the story unfolded in the year 1997. "Trust me, you'll like this one," She promised. Well, she was right—I probably gobbled it up in about two days. In Remembrance Ms. Deveraux's heroine, Hayden, is a romance author, and in her story, we find that she's always been a storyteller ('always' as in her past lives.) I thought, 'hey, I've made up stories to amuse myself all my life." So that night I paced in Cyndi's kitchen while she did the dishes, and came up with my first romance plot. I messed with it for years, even fiddled around with three additional stories. In 2005 I got serious and joined RWA. I met fun, crazy, creative women who were just like me and realized I had come home.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Genella: Historical. There was never a doubt in my mind. :)


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Genella: Funny you should ask. In high school—I don't remember the particulars, but I had turned in two tiny pieces of fiction (which could be viewed as sweet romance) to my English teacher. (Of course, the assignments read more like an outline to my since enlightened eyes, but hey, we all have to start somewhere! LOL) My friend Cyndi was my first heroine. :) She still has the assignments in her possession. The cool thing is, she married her hero and they are still living happily ever after.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Genella: Since I write historical romance, I do a lot of research. Internet mostly (for etymology and accurate information about real people, places and things) but my other half is a history major from the University of Southern California. I'm always asking him, "Who was king/queen in (insert region and year here)?" I'd love to have my characters speak as if they are from the period, but I've noticed editors want a bit more modern-sounding voices. Personally, I love to read historically accurate voices where they use antiquated (to our ears) words and phrases. Not only would the language define the class of the character, but it pulls a reader right into the story and adds a rich dimension a writer could only achieve by dumping a bunch of historical facts onto the page—which would promptly put all of us to sleep. LOL.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your upcoming novel, Remember Me?


Genella: On one of the reader's boards I'm involved with, there was a fun thread about creating the perfect vampire hero. Well, my vampire idea rapidly morphed into a penitent fallen angel. :) Oy! Talk about a turn-around!


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Genella: Before I even have a concept, my characters come to me—but at very odd times. I have to stop whatever I'm doing and grab a pen & paper. For instance, I was sitting in a loud family restaurant/cowboy bar in Tombstone, AZ during a research trip for my manuscript, "Come the Rain" and BAM! I got this idea for a Victorian woman who shows up in her mother's formal parlor in trousers. The story sort of rattled around in my head for a few hours and when we returned to the Tombstone Bed & Breakfast, I jumped onto my laptop and pounded out a bare-bones outline. That's how "The Trouser Game" was born.

Names. I'm very particular with names. The character's voice doesn't ring true until they have the just the right name. Sequentially, I'm meticulous about my titles, too. Here's hoping I get to keep them all—I've heard stories.... *grin*


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Interview with Angela Cameron

 

Angela Cameron
Angela Cameron
We have today erotic romance author from Ravenous Romance Angela Cameron being interviewed by me. I met her through Keta Diablo who writes for Ravenous Romance as well and I had a great time interviewing Angela that I got to know her and her writing better. But that is not all because I have had the pleasure of reading and reviewing both her RR books in her Blood & Sex series. I also had the pleasure of hosting Angela Cameron's day on the Ravenous Romance Blog Tour last Tuesday where I learned so much. You can find the review for the first book in her Blood & Sex series called Blood & Sex, Vol. 1: Michael and you should also keep a look out for the reviews for the second book in her series Blood & Sex, Vol. 2: Jonas. Also Angela will be guest blogging about her first book in her Blood & Sex series on Thursday, April 30 so come back to read about how she came up with the first book in the series. Leave your comments and questions because Angela Cameron will be stopping by to answer any that you leave in the comments section. Now for the interview:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing erotic romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Angela Cameron: *laughing* It takes me a while to figure out some things. For the erotic romance issue, I didn’t realize that this was what I was going to do until I was already doing it. I didn’t really know what I was writing when I started down this road. I came at it from the urban fantasy angle, Laurell K. Hamilton and Anne Rice having been my favorites at that point. So, I just wrote the story the way that I wanted, and it was too steamy for certain publishers. One thing led to another, and here I am—an erotic romance writer.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of erotic romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Angela: I always knew that I wanted to write about the paranormal. It’s my passion. I just fell into a crack between horror, suspense, and erotic romance. I write a little of all three, but I finally chose to accentuate the romance line in the books last year because the love story became the most fascinating aspect for me.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Angela: I started writing from a young age. But I didn’t write a full novel until about four years ago. Oh, I still have the story. *grins* In fact, I’ve been thinking of finishing it up now that I know what I’m doing. It’s a bit more of a horror novel, a vampire fiction, of course. I think it’s still my favorite, too.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Angela: It depends on the novel, Blood & Sex, Vol. 3, which takes place in Venice. That’s taking a good bit of extra research. Otherwise, the research usually goes along pretty quickly. I’m finding that I have a talent—an intuitive skill—for finding things.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel, Blood & Sex Vol. 1: Michael, which is part of your Blood & Sex series?


Angela: Michael came to me first, with Tori along for the ride. He sort of appeared when I was doing research for a BDSM article. From there, the story grew organically, with both main characters trying to have their own story. It sort of wrote itself really.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel, Blood & Sex Vol. 2: Jonas, which is part of your Blood & Sex series?


Angela: Jonas was a little different. He loves to be in the spotlight and have his way. *laughs* His basic story came along naturally, but I had to work hard to keep him on track. If he’d his way, the entire series would be about him. I don’t think any of us want to spend quite that much time in Jonas’s dungeon though.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your Blood & Sex series and how many more books do you think will you be writing for that series?


Angela: It all started with Michael. I thought that he was going to be one book. Then, when Lori Perkins mentioned a series (and the title), the world just exploded with characters jumping forward to tell their stories. I don’t know that I’ll ever write all the stories, but the day I sat down to sketch up basic ideas for the trilogy, the guys stepped up to give me ideas for seven books. I stopped writing them down after the seventh, but every guy in Collins Bay wants a story written about him. Even characters that aren’t introduced in the trilogy have torrid stories to tell.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Angela: I can’t really take credit for it. It’s like they’re already people in my imagination who tell me who they are. I know that it sounds pompous, but it’s the truth. I just write it down. The only thing that isn’t quite that way is the names. I go through lists of names based on their origin, time period, etc. Then, the character pictures the name. I’ve tried choosing names that I liked, but it never feels right, and I have to go back to what they want.


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Interview with Elle Amery

 

Elle Amery
Elle Amery
We have today erotic romance author from Ravenous Romance Elle Amery being an author guest blogger. I met her through Keta Diablo who writes for Ravenous Romance as well and I had a great time interviewing Elle that I got to know her and her writing better. But that is not all because I have had the pleasure of reading and reviewing both her RR books in her Quartzton series. You can read the review for the first two books in her Quartzton series Saving Sophie and Grace on Fire and keep an look out for my review of her third book Tally's Gift. Also Elle will be guest blogging about her last book in her Quartzton series on Thursday, April 30 so come back to read about how she came up with the three books in the series. Leave your comments and questions because Elle Amery will be stopping by to answer any that you leave in the comments section. Now for her interview: 

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Elle Amery: I’ve wanted to be a writer since I could read. Romance is one of the genres in which I write. I also write children’s fiction and am working on two YA novels and a contemporary novel that has some sex in it but is mostly about friendship. Those will be published under a different name. But I love romance—it's where my heart lies!


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Elle: I’m a sappy romantic! Although I’d originally targeted contemporary romance, I found that many of the storylines I had in my head had too much of a sexual basis to them. In Tally’s Gift, the entire book wraps itself around the six-week sex-fest in which Tally and Brett indulge. In addition to the overtly sexual nature of the stories roaming about in my head, I found that when I wrote sex scenes, they went on for pages and pages—not exactly what traditional romance publishers had in mind!


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Elle: The first full story I ever wrote was in sixth grade. I gave it to my best friend as a present—and yes, she still has it! It wasn’t a romance (in sixth grade I still thought kissing was disgusting!); it was a story about a girl and a horse.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Elle: I research as I write, using the Internet. I tend to write what I know, and since I write contemporary there isn’t a whole lot of need for research. But, there are moments when I do need to get online and start digging around. In Tally’s Gift, for example, I did some research into how to prepare bath and body products using green products. And in Grace on Fire I did some research into anger management techniques.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel, Tally’s Gift, which is part of your Quartzton series?


Elle: Many years ago a male friend of mine had injured both hands and wasn’t able to do the same thing Brett Huntsman wasn’t able to do *wink wink*. All of his friends teased him mercilessly about his towering condition. One of the nurses at the hospital had been flirting with him and, like Brett, neither his pain nor his pain killers managed to keep that good man down! I teased him I would write a story about his “problem,” and several years later, Tally’s Gift was created.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your Quartzton series and how many more books do you think you will be writing for that series?


Elle: The Quartzton series came about when I thought up the storyline of Tally’s Gift. Although it was the last book in the series, it was the first story I thought up. As I would dream about Tally, her friends Sophie and Grace became more clearly formed. It was obvious each had a story to tell. I’d originally thought that the Quartzton series would end with Tally’s Gift. However, one of the antagonists, Doris, from Saving Sophie and Grace on Fire, is actually quite a sympathetic character and has an intriguing story to tell, especially when the daughter she gave up for adoption shows up in town. Her story, Doris’s Choice, should be out this summer with Ravenous Romance. Also, sex hound Don Marshall, from Grace on Fire, has a lot to learn about being a good man. What the readers don’t know is that he was a total loser nerd in high school and college and has tried to cover it up with sexual bravado. I expect to see these two other books in the Quartzton series coming out by autumn 2009.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Elle: I made the mistake of naming the antagonist in Saving Sophie “Doris”, after a girl in high school who had been nothing but mean to me. The mistake came when I realized that Doris had an intriguing story to tell—my character Doris, that is. But that realization brought up something—what if Doris from high school had experienced a similar tough life? Just that thought alone helped me form the character of Doris in a more multi-layered way. With my other characters I tend to give them names I like that would fit with their family’s socio-economic status.


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Interview with Rie McGaha

 

Rie McGaha
Rie McGaha
This is one of Rie McGaha’s stops on her virtual book tour that is being given by Dorothy Thompson of Pump Up Your Book Promotions Company that does virtual book tours for authors. Here is my interview with Rie McGaha.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing erotic romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life?

Rie McGaha: LOL, I'm not sure I ever knew. I started out writing sweet romance, using words like "shaft" and "sweet love trail" to describe anatomy. It sounded ridiculous when I read it to myself, so I started using common language and felt it was a much better match for me.


Phoebe: Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Rie: I don't think I can pick just one because I was influenced by different works by different authors. Anne Rice's Mayfair Witches series comes to mind, I just loved that whole storyline. Some of Nora Roberts' earlier works, the historicals, are some of my favorites. I love Sherrilyn Kenyon, Alyssa Day and Lynsay Sands too.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of erotic romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Rie: I write in different genres now, everything from paranormal, time travel, to contemporary, and I usually cross genres in the same story!


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Rie: The first fiction I ever wrote was in the 8th grade and it was a historical about a teacher who came from the east coast to the wild, wild west to start a school. I can say it was very, very mild compared to what I write now, but there was still an element of romance. And no, it's long gone and I hadn't even thought of it till now!


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Rie: Research really depends on the storyline, but I do more research for historicals than I do for contemporary work. I love American history, so it's not a burden for me to get lost in my research. But, I am writing erotic romance and it's not the great American novel, nor is it intended to be. I write for pleasure, amusement, entertainment and titillation. It's purely fiction so I don't feel bad about tweaking history if I need to or about changing the facts to suit the story. My short story, Grounded, was loosely based on Greek god, Dionysus, the god of wine and revelry. He was the son of Zeus, whom I put in the story, but he wasn't the son of Aurora, nor did he have a brother named, Ira, who were also in the story. The real story of Dionysus is pretty graphic and didn't suit my needs, so I tweaked it until it did. That's the fun of writing fiction, it can go anywhere my mind takes it.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel, Blood Line?


Rie: Funny story. My husband, Nathan, was a truck driver and a huge sci-fi fan. He's absolutely mesmerized by vampires and werewolves and zombies. One night on the road, he had a dream he was attacked by werewolves, so when he told me the dream, I laughed of course. But as I got to thinking about it, I thought, hey, this might work as a book, and it did. I'm working on the sequel, Ancient Blood right now!


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Rie: Well now...I don't think up the characters, the voices in my head do that, and the characters they tell me about already have names. I know how that sounds, but it's the truth! All my characters are like actual people to me. I know everything about them, including their family history.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in Blood Line?


Rie: I really enjoyed writing about all the characters in Blood Line, but my favorite is Ganda. She's old and wise and she's figured out a lot of things in her life. She's strong because she's been through so much in her life, and she's loving and caring, but you really don't want to mess with her or get on her bad side!


Phoebe: Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in Blood Line?


Rie: Yeah, I kind of think Ganda is a version of me, but unfortunately, I can't kill anyone with a single bite!


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Rie: I really don't. If the voices in my head aren't talking, I'm not writing and they can take really long breaks sometimes!


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Interview with Kathye Quick

 

Kathye Quick
Kathye Quick
This is one of Kathye Quick’s stops on her virtual book tour that is being given by Dorothy Thompson of Pump Up Your Book Promotions Company that does virtual book tours for authors. Here is my interview with Kathye Quick.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Kathye Quick: I began to write in 1988 after reading a cajillion romances and thinking “I could do this.” Turns out I really couldn’t. I had an awful lot to learn about writing. Mainly reading romances is not the same as writing romances. There wasn’t one author that inspired me as much as there was one author who helped me. Barbara Breton, a New York Times Bestselling Author was getting started herself back then. She was a Harlequin author who I met at a bank one day. We began talking and she encouraged me to come to a local writer’s group that weekend. I did and that’s when I began to find out just how much I didn’t know about writing romances.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Kathye: I wrote a contemporary romance I thought was the bomb. It was. Literally. I couldn’t PAY to have it published back then. As I said, I had a lot to learn. Now I’m comfortable writing anything and I do!


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Kathye: WINCH!! The contemporary romance I wrote was called DUTY OR DESIRE. I actually still like the name. It was about a Police Officer and the women he left many years ago. Can you tell he ultimately had to choose between duty or desire? Needless to say it was awful. I had it on disk, but I lost it when I lost my house to the flooding of Hurricane Floyd back in 1999. Maybe that was someone’s way of telling my just how bad it was!


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Kathye: This is probably not the right way to do it, but I research as I go. So far it’s been working. If I find that I’ve written myself somewhere I know nothing about, I get on the Internet and Google.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel Cynthia and Constantine, which is part of your Beyond Camelot, Brother Knights series?


Kathye: Believe it or not, the concept for Cynthia and Constantine, my new release from the Wild Rose Press, sprang up during a season of American Idol. (To find out more about how Kathy came to write Cynthia and Constantine come back on Wednesday, May 20th to read her author guest blog about it.)


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your Beyond Camelot, Brother Knights series and how many more books do you think will you be writing for that series?


Kathye: If I like something I want to know more. I love the Arthurian Era and mythology, so I knew that just one book was not going to be enough. There will be a sequel to this book called Jane and Braeden because in the course of fleshing out the story so it would be long enough for a book, Jane’s character became an integral part of the story and now we need to hear her story also.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Kathye: My characters are a mix of people I know and my fantasies. My hero, Sir Constantine is the perfect knight—honorable, brave, kind and gallant. He’s also based on my husband who’s darn cute. Lady Cynthia is definitely based on one of my friends, Cynthia. She’s blond, beautiful, independent and true to what she believes. While the names of my characters in Cynthia and Constantine came from American Idol, believe it or not I Googled to find names. Try it. For my fantasy series I’m writing for example, I Googled “Ancient Greek Names” and then read them until I found one I liked. Then I adapted it to a more modern sounding name. You can also Google “baby names” or something to fit the timeline or genre in which you are writing such as “western names” or “native American names.”


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Interview with Kiki Howell

 

Kiki Howell
Kiki Howell
Today we have a special guest here being interviewed. Kiki Howell is a new author to me and when she contacted me about reviewing her latest novel The Witch’s Beast as well as to schedule an interview and guest blog I looked into her novels to see what she writes about. I found that her novel The Witch’s Beast to be very intriguing since it's similar to the story called The Beauty and the Beast but it's told in the perspective of the witch. I had a great time reading it and you should watch out for my review of it soon as well as for the guest blog by Kiki that will be posted this Thursday, May 28. Now on to the very informative interview between me and Kiki Howell:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Kiki Howell: I would have to guess end of high school to beginning of college. My mother owned every Danielle Steele book ever written, and I started reading them in high school.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Kiki: I really didn’t get to experiment much. I had not written in years as life had thrown me a few curve balls. When I started writing again, I guess I just started writing all those stories I had stuck in my head. I was an avid reader of paranormal romance by then, so it was where I wanted to start. The erotic thing on the other hand, came from a writing exercise that said you could get your creativity flowing again by writing in a genre you were not comfortable with, as in unfamiliar with. I had just read a few erotic romances, so I gave it a try.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Kiki: I remember writing stories as a kid, but nothing sticks out in my mind as far as subject. By middle school, I was writing the after-school special type of stories that were so popular back then. Only, I have no idea where they went. A question for my mom I guess. In college, as an English major, I was still writing the socially conscious type stories too, with some romance sprinkled in. Thank goodness I can only locate three of those now!!! But, I didn’t start writing romance until about two years ago after a long break of not writing at all.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Kiki: I get so caught up in the research. I really enjoy that phase and tend to linger in it too long. I buy books and get several from the library. I always have a notebook going of things I need to know for the stories. I read a lot of Wicca books, and spin it into fantasy. Right now I am reading about quantum physics, the 11:11 code (not the Da Vinci stuff) and about the Mayan religion to create a world of my own making. You just never know with me. My hardest research was for two regency stories that I have submitted now.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest novel, The Witch’s Beast?


Kiki: It was a personal grudge I had with the Brothers Grimm. As a kid, I could never understand why the witch, who cast the spell that started it all, only got a one sentence mention. When I saw that Whiskey Creek Press Torrid had a line of Torrid Twisted Tales, I had to rewrite it. The erotic aspect was just an added bonus!


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Kiki: Sometimes all I have is a character, and I have to ask myself what they are going to get into. If I am working the opposite way with a storyline first, I create a character that would be most interesting in it. All of my characters names have a meaning or two. For example, my current WIP has a character named Kamillia. The “illi” part of the name represents the 11:11 code device used in the story as a way for the spirits to speak to those on earth, K is the 11th letter in the alphabet, and the rest is derived from a friends name who gave me “The 11:11 Code” book that sparked the idea that got the story rolling. Then when I had to name her in her past life, I started with the nationality and time period I needed since she lived in Italy in 1427 and found a name with an appropriate meaning for the personality of the character, which was Alessandrina meaning “defender of men.”


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Interview with J.K. Coi

 

J.K. Coi
J.K. Coi
I have a special guest today being interviewed by me and I hope that you enjoy reading the interview as much as I had doing it. J.K. Coi contacted me to review her latest novel in her Immortal series and in the process we scheduled an interview as well as a guest blog. So keep a look out for a book review of her 4th book in her Immortal series called Forever Immortal, which is scheduled to be released on Tuesday, June 16th by Linden Bay Romance. And also remember to come back here on Thursday, June 4th to read her guest blog about how she came to write Forever Immortal after writing the first three books in her Immortal series. Now onto the interview:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

J.K. Coi: Well, I’d love to say that I made a conscious decision to move my life in a certain direction and that writing romance was it. In reality, I was working full time and in the evenings after my son was in bed I was getting...bored. I’ve always read books—any kind, all kinds—but I’ve never been one for television. After cleaning out the closet one night (I was REALLY bored), I found some of my stories from when I was in school, and the juices started flowing. By the end of that night I’d already written my first scene. Even though it was horrid and no longer exists, it started me on the path.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


J.K.: I don’t think there was ever really any doubt about the genre I would write. Paranormal/urban fantasy comes most naturally to me, and fits my voice the best.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


J.K.: LOL, I don’t know if it was my first work of fiction, but I wrote a short story in high school entitled “Martians in the Kitchen”. Man that was bloody. I was in a Dean Koontz/Stephen King phase, I think. Here’s to a very open-minded Gr. 10 English teacher.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


J.K.: Hm. Research, eh? What’s that? No, seriously I do quite a bit of reading for my Immortal books, all about demonology and ancient theology, etc. My university background helps me a lot in this. When it comes to writing though, I take everything else that I’ve read and mush it all together to come up with what I want. Because my world is my own, I can twist history and reality to suit me—and that’s one of the main reasons I love writing in this genre as well.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest release, Forever Immortal, which is the fourth book in your Immortal Series?


J.K.: Forever Immortal wasn’t always going to be book four. In fact, when I came up with the original idea for Gideon’s book, it was going to be the second in the series. When that changed, I had to re-think how things were going to work, and I was very glad that I did. I have loved Gideon’s character since I was first introduced to him in Book 1, and even though he never returned in books 2 and 3, his story was always in the back of my mind. Being the fourth, I wanted this book to be more. More emotional. More explosive. More conflicted. More dangerous. And I think it’s got all of that in spades, while at the same time it also leads in to the next phase of this series.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your Immortal Series and how many books did you plan to write when you started the series and do you plan to write any after Forever Immortal?


J.K.: The concept for the series evolved gradually. When I started writing the first book in the series, My Immortal, I was really just finding my voice and seeing where an idea could lead me. After I finished it and spent a long time editing, fixing and rewriting, I understood that I had serious potential and ideas for the other books started to take shape. The series as a whole really took on a life of its own at that point. After writing book 2, Immortal Kiss, I had uncovered still another facet of the greater plotline, and after Dark Immortal, I think I had pretty much worked out the rest. That’s another reason why I like Forever Immortal so much. I was able to write it without fighting to figure out its place in the series.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


J.K.: Character names are just something that come to me. Besides once, I’ve never had any trouble naming characters, and the names tend to stick. But Rhys from my first book started out as a Julian. Yeah...that didn’t last long. Great name. It just didn’t fit. The characters themselves—their personality traits, baggage, conflict—I honestly don’t know how to explain where that comes from. I usually start a book with a character. Maybe a visual of him/her, or a phrase of dialogue. It spurs a little burst of writing, and I come up with a scene that will hopefully inspire more writing and eventually, a greater understanding of the character. Sometimes it means going back after I get to about the half-way point of the book and reworking some things to make it fit better, but I don’t mind.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your novel Forever Immortal?


J.K.: Gideon is a character I’ve always loved. I’ve been looking forward to his story from the very beginning. I like that he is more than what he seems. He’s more than a warrior. He’s also brilliant and compassionate. He takes his responsibilities very seriously, but he has a sharp sense of humor as well. He doesn’t shy away from conflict and won’t give up on what he wants—especially when what he wants is Lyssa.


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Interview with Cecilia Tan

 

Cecilia Tan
Cecilia Tan
Today my special guest is erotic romance author Cecilia Tan. She contacted me about being interviewed and being a guest blogger here at TAMFA as well as having her current releases Mind Games & The Hot Streak reviewed as well. Today you will be enjoying an interview between me and Cecilia Tan that I had fun reading as well giving it. Thursday, June 11 Cecilia Tan will be guest blogging about how she came to write her current releases Mind Games & The Hot Streak. Also be on the lookout for my reviews of both her books, her current releases Mind Games & The Hot Streak, here on my blog.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing erotic romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Cecilia Tan: I knew erotica was going to be a major part of what I wrote when I had first graduated college. Up until then, I had thought I would be a science fiction/fantasy writer, but when I finally got out of school and started working my first day job, I thought "okay, now you have to start your writing career, too." So I started writing stories at night. I sat down at the computer every night for several weeks and I wrote five stories in five weeks. The only one that was worth anything was the one really erotic one, which I called "Telepaths Don't Need Safe words." It mixed together science fiction and erotica, and was also really different from the rest of the erotica out there. I didn't know this at the time, but the vast majority of erotic fiction out there is based on "the encounter." In other words, two people meet, then they have sex. It's nearly always the first time they meet, and even when it isn't, it's usually the first time they have sex. Whereas I started out with two characters who already knew each other and were well into an epic lifelong romance when the story took place! So that was in 1991. I've been writing stuff that goes against people's expectations and mixes together sci-fi, fantasy, erotica, love stories, and anything else I feel like ever since.

Honestly, I didn't think I would end up writing romance. I won't name names, but I tried to read a romance novel while I was in college and it was plainly awful. The writer's idea of a description was to write "he was good-looking." The characters didn't make sense and the dialogue made me cringe to read it. It was a bestselling novelist, too, but maybe she had gotten lazy by her 20th book or whatever it was? I don't know what the story was behind it, but I was turned off the genre for almost 20 years as a result. My career moved more toward science fiction and fantasy, and I was making friends with a lot of sf/fantasy writers. And several of them had started writing romances under pseudonyms. They were all like "oh, you should try it again! It's so much fun. Romances are so much better now than they used to be!" But I was busy and I always have a million books I want to read, so I didn't really try reading a romance again until I had read some of the sf/fantasy writers who people told me were popular with romance readers, too. Like Catherine Asaro and Anne Bishop and Laurell K. Hamilton. Because of that bad first experience, I was really leery, but reading and enjoying the books by these women showed me there were other styles of romance and that good writing was more the norm!


Phoebe: Did you know what type of erotic romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Cecilia: I always knew I was more interested in the paranormal romances. I just love fantasy and magic. But when the idea to write one with a baseball theme came along, I didn't hesitate to write a "real world" romance, too!


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Cecilia: I have tons and tons of old notebooks from when I was eleven, twelve years old. Some might be older than that. I wrote a lot of attempts at fantasy epics like the Lord of the Rings, and space opera like Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica (the OLD series of Battlestar Galactica). And erotica, too. When I was a teenager I wrote stories pairing my friends with their favorite celebrities! So I guess it's not a big surprise what I ended up writing!


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Cecilia: So far I have always stuck with milieus I am already familiar with. I've been setting my books in towns and cities I know fairly well, and when it comes to things like major league baseball, that's a world I know very well, too, from my nonfiction writing work. (I've written and edited several baseball history books.) What's funny is the romance novel I'm working on right now is set at Harvard University, which is not even a mile from my house, and I'm spending probably an hour a day researching things like the names of buildings and university history and such! The book I'm writing right now is called MAGIC UNIVERSITY, and the concept is sort of like the Harry Potter books, except college. And with a decent love story!


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel, Mind Games?


Cecilia: I had this image in my mind of the two characters, the detective and the telepathic woman, just spring into my mind about ten years ago. I tried to write a short story with them, but I didn't get beyond writing a kind of moody fragment. So I put them on the shelf in the back of my head for a while (ten whole years!) figuring when the time was write, I'd take those dolls down and play with them again. I was having dinner with the editor for Ravenous Romance one night and she asked me if there was anything in paranormal romance I wanted to explore, and I burst out with, "what about this?" And described to her the idea I had for the characters and how they connect. She was like, go for it! So I went home and out poured a whole plot synopsis, which Ravenous Romance bought right away. I was so happy to finally have a home for Wren and Derek!


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel, The Hot Streak?


Cecilia: What's funny is THE HOT STREAK originally grew from another project entirely, a non-fiction book, where I was going to help the wife of a major league player write her autobiography. Since I write about baseball, but I'm a female writer also, she wanted someone who knew both about the baseball business and who could portray a woman's point of view. In the end, publishers weren't interested in the book, though, except for a romance publisher, who wanted to know if it could be done highly fictionalized as if it were a romance novel, but the "real names have been changed." But then they decided they weren't interested in that either. Meanwhile, though, I had a meeting with the editor there, and she suggested maybe I should start from scratch with a baseball-themed romance that wasn't related to this real story at all. So I started plotting out my dream romance between a baseball star and a twenty-something working woman...Ultimately that publisher decided baseball just wasn't their thing, so lucky for me Ravenous Romance grabbed it immediately!


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Cecilia: Sometimes a name just comes to me the moment I think of a character, but other times I only have their first name or a nickname. I sometimes page through the phone book. There are also lots and lots of sites on the Internet where you can look up the meanings of names, which is really useful! Baby names sites and family genealogy and so on. I try to pick names that sound nice to say out loud, that have a nice look on the page, and that have a meaning or association with the character that seems fitting. Wren in Mind Games is kind of a fragile character, so a bird name worked well for her, while Casey, the heroine in The Hot Streak, is kind of a tough cookie, so even though she's a very feminine character, I wanted a gender-neutral name for her, plus the fact that "Casey" is a name that comes up in old time baseball history a lot.


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Interview with Charline Ratcliff

 

Charline Ratcliff
Charline Ratcliff
Charline Ratcliff is a newly published author who contacted me to find out if I would review her debut novel The Curse of Nefertiti. I found the novel's blurb to be fascinating that I sent her an email back asking if she would like to also have an author interview and author guest blog scheduled along with the book review. So today I will be posting the very informative interview between me and Charline that I really had fun writing up the questions and reading her answers. Leave comments or questions to this post because Charline will be stopping by on and off today answering them. Also if you miss today come back on Thursday when Charline will be guest blogging about her debut novel The Curse of Nefertiti further. And keep a look out for my review on her novel as well but for now here is my interview:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Charline Ratcliff: I didn’t realize until I was almost completely finished with The Curse of Nefertiti that I had a calling as an author. I’m not sure that any specific author inspired me to write romance—I think I mainly noticed how a great romance plays a big part in how good a story is.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Charline: I didn’t have a specific type of romance in mind when I started writing this book. In the writing of the book I never really had a set path for it to take—I just wrote and let the story shape the book.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Charline: According to my father I wrote a short science fiction story when I was nine—however, I don’t have it and I don’t think my parents do anymore either.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Charline: I do quite a bit of research while I am writing a book. Luckily for me I have always had an innate knowledge about Egypt and that definitely helped with the writing of this book. More often then not when I went to research something I had written I was quite surprised to find it was factual. It can take a lot of time to gather the information. I generally do the research as I am writing because I don’t figure out exactly where the story is going before I write it. I start with the beginning (dreams) and I have an end in mind but other than that I let the story shape itself as I write it.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your debut novel, The Curse of Nefertiti?


Charline: I had a very vivid dream in November 2006. In fact, the Prologue for The Curse of Nefertiti is the actual dream.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Charline: Hmmm…I don’t remember how I came up with the name Kayla but I wanted a female name that I had never heard used before. Some of the supporting characters had traits which reminded me of people I know in my own life so I would come up with a name starting with the same letter as the name of the person they reminded me of. For the man—I wanted someone foreign, so I chose Italian for the nationality and Paolo. Paolo is actually based off a man I met while out with a friend.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your debut novel The Curse of Nefertiti? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your debut novel The Curse of Nefertiti?


Charline: The favorite character I enjoyed writing about most was Nefertiti herself. As far as relating to any of the characters I would have to say I relate quite a lot to Kayla.


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Charline: I have five more Prologues for different books written, each of them is from a dream I have had.


Phoebe: You’ve written a standalone novel but have you considered writing a series before? How do you think writing each would be different for you?


Charline: This is a stand-alone novel however; I did leave the ending open as I am considering writing a sequel to it in the future.


Phoebe: What process did you have to go through to get your first book published and did it take you long?


Charline: I think I was pretty lucky actually. I was originally going to write the novel completely and then mail it off to publishers. Then I realized I have no experience in marketing myself so I figured maybe I should look into getting agent. Again, I decided to wait until I was finished with the novel because I knew my Prologue was rough and didn’t flow quite as well as the rest of the book. One weekend I’d had a really bad day, my car payment was fifteen days past due and my lender repossessed it. I had NO idea that could happen! Everybody KNOWS you have to be at least thirty days past due before that can happen! *chuckle* I discovered in Arizona if you are even one day late your lender CAN and a lot of times WILL repossess the auto. Anyway, so the next day (Sunday) I had the urge to rewrite the Prologue. Once it was finished I reread it and then even though my manuscript wasn’t complete I felt this sense of urgency to find an agent RIGHT NOW! I did my research a few months before and learned all the things agents and agencies should NOT do! Finally, after more searching I found an agency whose mission statement I liked and I submitted a request to have them look at my manuscript. I won’t bore you with the details of the next three weeks but bottom-line they were interested in taking me on as a client. In August I submitted the first five chapters of my book to a publishing company that my agent referred me to and November 22, 2008 I was informed that the publishing company would like to work with me. It seems fitting that I received this news in November as November was the birth month of the book so to speak. I was very lucky in the fact that the first agency and also the first publisher I ever contacted both wanted to take me on.


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Interview with Rebecca J. Vickery

 

Rebecca J. Vickery
Rebecca J. Vickery
Today I have a special romance author that I met through one of the various social media websites that I'm a member of. I guess me and my blog have been getting pretty popular with romance authors and I'm glad that Rebecca contacted me in hopes of promoting herself and her current and upcoming novels with an author interview, author guest blogs and book reviews. Today I'm interviewing her about her writing process and about herself as well as her novels. On Thursday she will be talking more about her debut novel Surviving with Love so don't forget to come back to learn more. I will reviewing that novel as well soon so keep an eye out for the review very soon but for now read the great interview I had with Rebecca J. Vickery.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Rebecca J. Vickery: I actually didn’t commit to writing romances until 1998. Before that I enjoyed writing but real life, my family, and obligations kept me very busy. My sister encouraged me to make the effort to put my ideas and plots on my computer and turn them into a book. The author that made me fall in love with romance stories was Gwen Bristow. I read Celia Garth when I was ten and I began daydreaming about the long looks and hand-holding. From then on I was hooked. For my psychic romances, Kay Hooper, my current favorite, was the author who inspired me to add psychic elements to some of my novels.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Rebecca: When I began writing, I wasn’t concerned with genre and really didn’t think about it. I just had a story that I had to get on paper. It didn’t matter if it was a tablet, the back of an envelope, or a napkin. When I had an idea, I had to write it down. I really haven’t experimented with different genres. My muse and I are comfortable with contemporary romances and I think we’ll just settle in with them for a while.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Rebecca: My very first fiction stories got me in major trouble. I wrote them in elementary school and turned them in when I was supposed to be writing serious assignments. Can you imagine a fourth or fifth grade teacher getting a romance story instead of an assignment on how I spent my summer vacation? But if you’re talking about books, Surviving with Love is my first fiction novel and I hope to have it with me for a very long time.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Rebecca: The amount of research depends on the location and the type of action I include in my books. For Surviving with Love, I had to do a lot of research on the Bitterroot Wilderness Area in Idaho and on the weather there as I’ve never even seen Idaho. But I do have firsthand knowledge of camping, hiking, and fishing so I didn’t have to do as much research in those areas. I also had to ask lots of questions about hostage rescue and I read a lot of articles about wilderness tracking. The research for me is an ongoing process. While I’m writing I often have to stop and look up something before I can go on. I don’t outline my novel and research first as many writers do. My characters write the story. I just do the research and put the words into the computer.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel latest release, Surviving with Love?


Rebecca: It was the product of a bit of news I heard on the TV several years ago about the theft of some special bearer bonds. Then later the same evening we heard about a plane crash. My brain went to work with “what ifs.” What if the thieves were on the plane that crashed? What if they took hostages? What if they survived the crash and escaped into the wilderness? What if a female tracker was the only one who could find them? What if she had to work with a tough hostage rescuer? What if they didn’t get along from the start? The questions went on and on. I don’t think I slept for three or four days while I started answering all those questions. By the time I finished I had enough material for Surviving With Love.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel upcoming release, Looking Through the Mist?


Rebecca: I actually dreamed the idea for Looking Through The Mist. I love children and I heard about a missing child before going to bed. During the night I dreamed that a psychic called the police and told them how to find the child but no one would believe her. I began working on the book the next day.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Rebecca: Most of my characters seem to blossom in my mind with names attached, at least the first names. In Surviving with Love, my hero had to have a tough, short, masculine name and Cord came immediately to mind. There have only been a couple of times when a character has made it through a few chapters without a name. Then as their characteristics and mannerisms develop, the name will just be there. I don’t search out the meanings or use lists to find names for my characters, but I’m sure some writers do.
 

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Interview with Reese Johnson

 

Reese Johnson
Reese Johnson
Today I have a special author who writes M/M Erotic Romance for Noble Romance Publishing and his name is Reese Johnson. His debut release, Sex & Chocolate, was one of the reason he contacted me because he heard about me through Rie McGaha that I do author interviews as well as book reviews. Well I was all to happy to help him out because I have found that I liked reading M/M Erotic Romance and wanted to give his work a try. So I will be reviewing his debut novel Sex & Chocolate as well as his second novel Soul Searchers which is a M/M paranormal erotic romance. He will also be coming back on Thursday, July 2 for a guest blog on how he came to write both his releases. For now here is my interview with him:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing M/M erotic romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Reese Johnson: I don’t know how to answer that really. I don’t think there ever was a moment when I sat down and said, “I’m going to write M/M erotic romance!” I am friends with a few authors who write M/M and I found the concept interesting, so with that idea coupled with my prison background, I started writing and the original version of Sex & Chocolate just seemed to flow into an M/M relationship.

Phoebe: Did you know what type of M/M erotic romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Reese: I really didn’t do either. I just wanted to have an avenue where I could say what I wanted to say and when I addressed the issue of AIDS, M/M seemed the logical course to be able to show the disease from both a “straight” and “gay” perspective.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Reese: No, it’s long gone, but I think it was poetry or song lyrics or something just as horrible.

Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Reese: So far all I’ve written has been two novellas and both are taken from life experience.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your debut release, Sex & Chocolate?


Reese: My sister-in-law has been trying to get me to write an autobiography since I spent so many years in prison and have seen a lot of things most people can’t even begin to comprehend, but for now, I’m not ready to delve into that part of my mind. So, I started thinking about some of the guys I knew who died in prison because of complications from being HIV positive. That got me to thinking that maybe I could write something that would address the issue of AIDS without being preachy, and once I started writing, the story just seemed to flow on its own.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your latest release, Soul Searchers?


Reese: I’m a big fan of sci-fi and all creatures of the night and thought it would be cool to write a werewolf story with a little twist, plus I could also use the story to address homophobia and prejudice. Gay werewolves have never been done as far as I know and the story just struck a chord within me and I began writing.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Reese: Hmmm, I don’t really know. They seem to have names when the character comes to mind.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your novel, Sex & Chocolate? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your novel, Sex & Chocolate?


Reese: Alan. He is so flamboyant and arrogant and funny. I just love him. And he reminds me of someone I used to know who is now dead from AIDS too.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your novel, Soul Searchers? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your novel, Soul Searchers?


Reese: In this one, I really don’t have a favorite character. I thought they were all great, but if I had to pick one, it would be Micah. He seems so vulnerable and like someone who needs to be taken care of, but he has an inner strength that allows him to carry burdens others probably wouldn’t be able to. I also like Hap, the little brother. I have a little brother and Hap is just fun to be with like my own brother is.
 

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Interview with Moira Keith

 

Moira Keith
Moira Keith
Today we have another romance author with us who I've seen in the various writing and reading communities that I'm a member of and she is also a member of the blog group called The Girls on Books. Moira contacted me about wanting to be interviewed on my blog so she could promote her debut novel, Buckling Down, and though it took us a bit to get a date down it is finally her day. She also scheduled a guest blog that you should remember to stop by for on Thursday, July 9 to learn more about her debut novel, Buckling Down, but for now read more about her, her writing process and what she likes to read in my interview with her.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Moira Keith: To be honest, I didn’t want to be a romance writer. Not in the vein of Harlequin anyhow. I knew I wanted to write though and had been writing on and off since I was in junior high. As far as authors who inspired me, there were many. Jeaniene Frost, Vicki Petterson, Nora Roberts, Laurell K Hamilton, Kim Harrison, Lori Devoti, and Teresa D’Amario are among my inspirations. Paranormal inspires me, some with more romance than others.

Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Moira: As an author, I like to think I am always evolving. I wanted to write paranormal. Romance just seemed to be part of the equation. My first release is all contemporary romance which is way off of what I thought I would write. My heart still calls to the paranormal genre, but I am a firm believer that you go where the story takes you.

Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Moira: My first piece of fiction was a story that fell along the lines of Sweet Valley High. I never allowed anyone to read it. There is no printed version of the story in existence, however I do believe it is on a REALLY old floppy disk. (You know the very flat and flimsy ones.)

Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Moira: The depth of research and time depends on the novel and subject matter in my opinion. Some information is easily found these days thanks to the internet, but I would love to be able to do more hands on research. I am a firm believer that it is easier to write about what you’ve experienced firsthand.

Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your debut novel, Buckling Down?


Moira: Well, I was stuck in the middle of a paranormal story. Flat out hit a brick wall and could not find my way over, under, or around it. So one morning, while I was driving to work, I passed a bar with a fabulous sign befitting the Las Vegas Valley I call home. The seed was planted for Buckling Down and it grew from there. I looked at it as an escape…just something fun I wanted to share with my mother.

Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Moira: Wow. Kind of a difficult question to answer, but I will do my best. The characters just come to me on their own terms. Sometimes they appear with the story idea, sometimes before. In Buckling Down for instance, I had the inspiration of the bar and with it came Sydney Hart, my little bar girl next door. The story I am working on now? Well the hero and heroine came to me first, the story just kind of developed around them.

Names… I am a name junkie. I see a name I like and I put it into a spreadsheet. Girls names, guys, and last names in a column down the middle. I try them on for size. There are characters that show up with name and all, then I have the others who keep their names under wraps until they decide to share them with me. There are so many great names out there, but I honestly have a thing for Celtic names so I tend to pull from there.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your debut novel, Buckling Down? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your debut novel, Buckling Down?


Moira: Sydney Hart, the heroine in Buckling Down, would actually be the answer for both. Though I enjoyed writing both my main characters, Sydney was both a challenge and enjoyable at the same time. I relate to her, but not through the loss she has suffered. I think most of us can relate to her basic desire to find a love that will stand the test of time and hold up against the trials and tribulations we all face in our lives. Plus she is a real smart ass, which if I were being honest is probably the main trait she inherited from me. Yes, I do brag about that.

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Interview with Lisa M. Campbell

 

Lisa M. Campbell (And Dogs)
Lisa M. Campbell (And Dogs)
Today I have romance author Lisa M. Campbell here for an author interview. She got in touch with me through my association with Jessica Coulter Smith and the e-publisher Wild Horse Press. She contacted me in hopes of scheduling an author interview, author guest blog as well as a book review for her historical romance novel, Superstition's Desire. Remember to come back on Thursday, July 16 to find out more about how she came to write her novel Superstition's Desire and keep a look out for my review of the novel as well. Now on to the interview between me and Lisa.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Lisa M. Campbell: I fell in love with Mr. Darcy at the age of thirteen. Pride and Prejudice had been my first foray into the world of romance and I was hooked! From that point on I wanted every story to have a happy ending, it just felt so satisfying. After awhile the feeling wasn't enough; I wanted to create my own characters and worlds.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Lisa: When I was a kid, my favorite movie was the 1938 film, 'The Adventures of Robin Hood' starring Errol Flynn. I would watch it every time it aired; I had the dialogue down pat. I was completely fascinated by the courtly rituals, chivalry and politics of the time. When I began to write, historical romance was a natural choice for me.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Lisa: What a good question! I remembered my first story, but uncertain I still had it. I started searching through closets, drawers and finally happened upon an old hat box full of old stories (I know, it sounds too cliché). But the hat box was where I found, 'Androchma's Fury.'


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Lisa:I do the bulk of the research upfront so I can write with knowledge and ease of the time period. I don't want the reader jarred from the story, because I had my medieval warrior plopping his tight buns into a lay-z-boy recliner after a day of pillaging.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your debut novel, Superstition’s Desire?


Lisa: Early superstition's have always held a fascination for me. Did you know bathing in the warm blood of a freshly killed mole was thought to clear up warts? I mean, who thought up this stuff? And more importantly, who was the first to try it? Given that some superstitions trace their roots to early religion, I thought it'd be interesting to have Arabella believe she was practicing Catholicism, while everyone else believed her to be a witch.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Lisa:I search through fashion catalogs for models I find attractive, then once I have the physical characteristics I'm looking for, I research names to match their looks.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your debut novel, Superstition’s Desire? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your debut novel, Superstition’s Desire?


Lisa: I really loved writing Uncle Angus; he always had a quip or witticism, and an optimistic outlook no matter the problem. I can't say I related to one character alone, though. There's probably a little bit of me in every character I write.


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Lisa: Beating my head against the wall, arguing with my husband and tearing my hair out—okay, that's a bit of an exaggeration. I don't really argue with my husband. I'm always jotting down snippets of things I've read or heard about, let them kinda ferment a bit, and then come back to them and see if I can salvage a plot idea from it. The majority of the time it works.


Phoebe: Have you ever considered writing a series or are writing stand alone novels your preference? How would writing each be different for you?


Lisa: I really love the Sookie Stackhouse series by Charlaine Harris, but it takes an awful lot to sustain a world like hers from book to book. I would love to do that, but at this point I don't think I have the chops for it. Right now I'm giving a secondary character from my current book a story of his own.


Phoebe: What process did you have to go through to get your first book published and did it take you long?


Lisa: I started submitting in April 2008, and despite three rejections before I signed with Wild Horse Press, each letter had given me clear insight as to where my story broke down. John Scognamiglio, Kensington's Ed-in-Chief, gave me a great critique on my MS. I didn't expect that, and despite his eventual rejection, I didn't consider it as such.


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Interview with Jasmine Aherne

 

Jasmine Aherne
Jasmine Aherne
Today I have romance author Jasmine Aherne here for an author interview. She got in touch with me through my association with the e-publisher Wild Horse Press. She contacted me in hopes of scheduling an author interview, author guest blog as well as a book review for her romance novel, Between the Lines. Remember to come back on Thursday, July 16 to find out more about how she came to write her novel, Between the Linesand keep a look out for my review of the novel as well. Now on to the interview between me and Jasmine.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Jasmine Aherne: Nora Roberts, without hesitation. The first book of hers I ever read was Born in Shame, and it took me through the whole gamut of emotions—joy, laughter, pain, heartache—and I thought, this is what I want to write, to make other people feel like this.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Jasmine: I’ve always liked contemporary. I want to show that love can give you a totally different outlook on life, especially in a cynical, too-busy modern world.

Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Jasmine: Now you’re asking! One of the first stories I ever wrote was called by the name of Treasures Lost, Treasures Found. It was about an archeologist called Mark who falls in love with a Peruvian woman. I wrote it when I was 16 and if I read it now I’d probably be horrified.

Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Jasmine: I use a lot of Google Street map. I try and talk to people, too. For example in my first novel, Stranded, the main character Rachel gets her passport stolen in New York. She’s British, so she had to go through a lengthy process at the British Embassy to get a new passport. Luckily one of my friends is married to a guy who used to issue new passports to unlucky travelers!

Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your current novel, Between the Lines?


Jasmine: My friend is a lawyer. She was always saying how she never had time for a relationship and how would she ever meet anyone. So I wrote it for her!

Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Jasmine: That’s a hard question. I normally choose a name at random, usually one I like or have heard bandied around, and then eventually the characters will name themselves if they don’t like it!

Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your novel, Between the Lines? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your novel, Between the Lines?


Jasmine: My favorite character is Aaron, because a lot of my test readers (or friends, haha!) said that they thought he was adorable. There’s a lot of one of my male friends in him, too, but I shall say no more on that subject!!

Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Jasmine: No, I don’t. I’ve tried to plan, but it never works for me. I normally just sit down with an idea and write a first draft straight off the cuff.

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Interview with Lex Valentine

 

Lex Valentine
Lex Valentine
Today I have romance author Lex Valentine, who I met through Katie MacAlister's forum, today being interviewed by me. She contacted me about reviewing a couple of her novels if possible as well as to schedule an author interview and author guest blog. I'll be reviewing the first three books in her Tales of the Darkworld series, Shifting Winds, Hot Water and Fire Season so keep coming back for the reviews. Lex will also be coming back this Thursday, July 30 for her author guest blog about her new release, Fire Season, so come back to find out more about the book and the series. Now onto the interview:

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Lex Valentine: I’ve always written, from the time I could string words together. I love words! I don’t think I’ve ever consciously chosen to be a romance writer. It’s just the genre (and sub-genres) that I love. Inspiration came from a lot of places. There are classics I love with an element of romance to them like the Gift of the Magi. And I love Lord Byron’s work. The man was incredibly passionate. When I got into romances, it was the regencies that drew me, starting with Georgette Heyer. The Corinthian is still one of my favorite books of all time.

Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Lex: I just write what comes to life in my head. I’ve been reading vampires since I was seventeen years old when my sister Jeannette gave me Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice for my 17th birthday. I moved from that to Chelsea Quinn Yarbro’s St Germain vampires and many others. More than twenty years ago I started developing the world that has become the Darkworld. Back then it was called the Dark Realms. I still have those original computer documents. Now, I write in multiple sub-genres: paranormal, erotica, contemporary, M/M, urban fantasy…

Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Lex: The first thing I ever wrote was poetry. Later, I moved into short stories. Mostly, horse and horse racing related little bits. I was a huge Black Stallion fan! I loved Alec and the Black. My first full length novel was written in my 20’s—long hand! Note By Note was a contemporary romance about a rock star. It has been lost since then. In fact, I don’t have any of the early stuff I wrote. The earliest stuff that I actually still have would be the Dark Realm stuff that I started writing before my daughter was born in 1989.

Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Lex: Since the Darkworld is my world, research isn’t really needed. I tend to write what I know. It’s easier that way. Occasionally, I need to know something about guns (for an urban fantasy) and I ask my DH who is very knowledgeable about them or I Google it. Mostly, if I need to know something, I Google it. I’m pretty quick when it comes to that sort of stuff. And I don’t center my books around things so much. They are all more about people.

Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your first two novels, Shifting Winds and Hot Water, which is the first and second book in your Tales of the Darkworld series?


Lex: I’d seen an open call at Pink Petal Books for dragon shifters. Since I write dragons at the serial story The Bar, and since I’d already been making some notes for the Darkworld, I decided I’d give the call a shot. I already knew Mary, the publisher, because she offered to help me with a short story I was trying to submit, Silver Lining. I delved into my notes for the Darkworld and started reading through them, found a part where I’d made a note about a cemetery owned by vampires and BOOM! The idea of a vampires who’d been burned at love who meets up with black dragon who’s always had a secret crush on her began to form in my head. Once Shifting Winds was done, I realized that Elysia’s brother Colin was a very interesting character. The idea to throw him together with Declan’s sister was born. It’s just grown from there mostly because of the three best friends—Sean Antaeus, Marius Granville, and Alfred Stone—and their machinations.

Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your Tales of the Darkworld series and how many books did you plan to write when you started the series and do you plan to write any after, Fire Season, your current release?


Lex: Tales started out with me playing off different ideas about secondary characters as I wrote Shifting Winds and moved almost immediately into Hot Water. I got the idea that it was a trilogy, each title having something to do with an element. By the time Hot Water was done, I knew I had six books in my head. When I started writing, Fire Season, I realized that this is a 10 book series that ends with the head of the Antaeus family, Sean.

Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Lex: They pop into my head. Seriously. Some are names I’ve stolen from my Bar characters or variations on those names. But even with my Bar story characters, most of the names have just popped into my head or I’ve seen them listed or used somewhere and liked it. Colin from my novel, Hot Water, got his name because I love Colin Bridgerton in the Bridgerton Family series by Julia Quinn’s called, Romancing Mr. Bridgerton.

Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your first two novels, Shifting Winds and Hot Water? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your first two novels, Shifting Winds and Hot Water?


Lex: I think my favorite character has to be Corey Green, Colin’s assistant. Corey is based on a real person that I know, my friend Gooster, whose real name is Corey. Gooster is pithy and amusing just like Corey in my book. I had so much fun writing Corey’s lines and in my head I could hear Gooster saying them! I think I identify with Eden Antaeus a bit more than the other characters in the first two books. I don’t really fit in with my family either. I’m the odd man out because I’m so responsible.

Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your upcoming release, Fire Season? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your upcoming release, Fire Season?


Lex: In Fire Season, I would have to say that I truly enjoyed showing Declan Antaeus’ back story, before he got together with Elysia. I think it gives him another layer that the reader wasn’t exposed to in Shifting Winds. The character I identified most within my current release, Fire Season, was again a secondary character, not one of the main ones. Garret’s boss Emily really grew as a character in my head as I wrote Fire Season. I started thinking about the reasons for her icy demeanor and the pain she eventually shows. Her story and Vahid’s—Ride the Lightning—was born out of how much I identified with Emily during the writing of Fire Season.

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Interview with Nicole Morgan

 

Nicole Morgan
Nicole Morgan Avatar
Today I have romance author Nicole Morgan here for an author interview. She got in touch with me through my association with the e-publisher Wild Horse Press. She contacted me in hopes of scheduling an author interview, author guest blog as well as a book review for her romance novel, Sudden Devotion, which was supposed to be out on August 11 with Wild Horse Press but won't be since Nicole and Wild Horse Press have decided to amicably part ways. Remember to come back on Thursday, July 16 to find out more about how she came to write her novel, Sudden Devotion, and keep a look out for my review of the novel as well. Now on to the interview between me and Nicole.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Nicole Morgan: Well that is a 2 part answer. I first was inspired to start writing almost 20 years ago, when my main addictions at the time were Danielle Steele and Jackie Collins. But it wasn’t until 2008 that I decided to really buckle down and go for it. It was the first time I ever decided to put any of the romantic stories in my head down on paper.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Nicole: I thought about writing a suspenseful romance, which I did, it had a lot of twists and turns, but the funny thing I realized when I started writing was that the erotic or sexy scenes came naturally to me. It’s actually harder for me to write those scenes without all of the steam.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Nicole: The first book I ever started to write was my first published book called, Sweet Redemption.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Nicole: That’s a funny question. I’m probably the most disorganized person when it comes to my research. When I sit down to write my story I don’t always know ahead of time what research I will all need so I will have to research as I go, which isn’t the most efficient method, but that way I get exactly what I’m looking for while it’s fresh in my mind. For example in the book I’m writing now, Blessing in Disguise I wrote a sentence that said, “Yes, I’m at the corner of ________ and ________.” Until I have a chance to pull up a city map for the Hollywood/Los Angeles area I won’t be able to fill that in. I don’t like to make up the information if it is a well known place. I want the two streets I mention to actually intersect.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your novel, Sudden Devotion?


Nicole: I came up with the premise and starting ground for Sudden Devotion after reading an article about how some couples today are using voyeurism as a way to spice up their love life.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Nicole: I choose the characters personalities within the first chapter. Usually I get an idea and start writing it. It isn’t until the second chapter that I have an idea of the kind of person that they are. As far as the male names I like to choose names that I myself find as masculine and sexy names. You’ll never find a leading man in my books called Wilmer. As for the women I try to pick a name that can be pretty, but sometimes, when possible I like to mix up the spelling, to make it different. An example would be in my current work in progress, instead of using Holly, I chose Hollie.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your novel, Sudden Devotion? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your novel, Sudden Devotion?


Nicole: I would say I really enjoyed writing about Sara. She seemed real to me. Throughout the book she struggles with a mixture of emotions, just like many women do. Still inexperienced with men she is forced to face her new found sexuality, her insecurities and her love and devotion for Mitch. Surprisingly I actually relate to her the most also. While my husband and I have been together and married for a long time I can’t help but remember that I was a bit shy and insecure when he ‘moved in for the kill’ so to speak all those years ago and turned me into the kind of gal that writes erotic romance.


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?

Nicole: I do things probably a lot differently than other authors. I get an idea in my head about a couple and how they might meet or what might bring them together. Then I sit down and literally start writing the characters and scenes until my idea comes to life.


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Interview with Clare Austin

 

Clare Austin
Clare Austin
Today I have a special guest who is promoting her debut novel with a virtual book tour with Goddess Fish Promotions. Romance author Clare Austin is here today to be interviewed by me about her, her writing and her debut novel and the first book of her Fadó Trilogy, Butterfly. Clare will be on tour from August 1st to 31st so if you want to stop by any of her other blog stops along the way check out her Virtual Book Tour information that will have links to all of her blog spots. Also Clare will be coming back on Thursday, August 20 to talk more about her debut novel, Butterfly, and who she came to write it. I will also be reviewing her novel, Butterfly, so you should keep a look out for the review soon now on to reading my interview with Clare Austin.

Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?


Clare Austin: I’ve been so many things in my life: actor, mom, wife, healthcare professional, musician and a horse trainer. Now I am adding published author to that list. I’m one of those people who needs several lifetimes to explore all my interests and I don’t seem to be capable of doing anything half way. I have been inspired by many authors throughout my lifetime. The first romance I ever read was Shanna by Kathleen Woodiwiss. I was enchanted and still hold her as one of the very best in the genre. More recently I have been captivated by the intensity and vastness of Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series. The lady can really spin a tale!


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Clare: Early in my ponderings, before I actually started putting words on paper, I envisioned writing Historical romance. I love history, I’m a stickler for facts and bristle at anachronism. I started writing contemporary because I simply wanted to write a book and I thought I was taking a simpler route to that goal. Then I found out it isn’t really easier, but is a great deal of fun. I have a number of historical ideas and they will get written someday I’m certain.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Clare: The very first fiction I wrote was when I was eight years old. I can’t remember the title, (probably something like Máire’s Big Day)…but it was about a little girl (me?) who takes a grand adventure on her pony through the hills near her home. I submitted this to a publisher and got a kind rejection. I don’t have that manuscript or the rejection letter…wish I did. The first contemporary romance I wrote four years ago is called Land Of Ahhs. It is unpublished and needs a major re-write. I’ll hang on to that one.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?

Clare: Much of the “research” for the Fad Trilogy was already in my head when I started the stories. I love research for the sake of knowledge though and I am constantly reading and studying. I spent quite a bit of time in Boston and in Ireland while I was writing Butterfly and Angel’s Share. When I have a question or am not sure of a particular fact, I look it up or go to an expert. Butterfly has a scene at a Red Sox game. It was really cool to research the game and include the actual plays in my scene. If a Sox fan happens to read it, it is accurate. No one else will care particularly, I’m sure.

Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your debut novel, Butterfly, which is also the first book in your Fadó Trilogy? And what are your titles and plans for the next two books that will complete your Fadó Trilogy?


Clare: Butterfly was a complete surprise to me. I wrote the first few chapters as an exercise for my critique group. I based the main character on one of my sons who is a professional musician and on some young Irish fiddlers I have known... (Come back on Thursday, August 20 to find the full response to this question)


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?

Clare: My characters are sometimes based very loosely on people I know, like Flannery being a bit like my son. But, the similarity stops at their both being dedicated musicians. Flannery is like a best friend I wish I’d had when I was in my twenties…fresh, adventurous, talented and devoted to music and family. Names are fun for me to make up. I love playing around with the sounds and meanings. The names I use often have an underlying hint to part of the story. I search through baby name lists until I find one that suits. I try to think about the character’s parents and why they would choose a particular name. I picked Hunter Kincade (Cade) because it sounds aristocratic but has a nickname this guy would be comfortable with. His middle name—read the book—reflects his mother’s ethnicity.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your debut novel, Butterfly? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your debut novel, Butterfly?


Clare: I absolutely loved getting to know Flannery. She was fun to write and carried the story easily. The other character I truly have a “crush” on is Jamie MacFallon. He is so endearing and I think he deserves his own book someday. I relate to all my characters in a special way. They are like my children, each having a place in my heart. One may give me trouble while another is easy.

Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Clare: They all start in my head. I can almost visualize the various components whirling around like different colors of paint that come out as a picture. Then I start to pound away at the keys and, even if it isn’t great prose, I get the basics down. Since Fad
is a series I have had to stick with some characters who are already part of the story and I plotted a bit more detailed than I sometimes like. I like to write from the seat of my pants…that’s the most fun.

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Interview with Lorhainne Eckhart

 

Lorhainne Eckhart
Lorhainne Eckhart
Today I have a special guest who is promoting her debut novel with a virtual book tour with Goddess Fish Promotions. Romance author Lorhainne Eckhart is here today to be interviewed by me about her, her writing and her debut novel, The Captain's Lady. Lorhainne will be on tour from August 1st to 31st so if you want to stop by any of her other blog stops along the way check out her Virtual Book Tour information that will have links to all of her blog spots. Also Lorhainne will be coming back on Thursday, August 27 to talk more about her debut novel, The Captain's Lady, and how she came to write it. I will also be reviewing her novel, The Captain's Lady, so you should keep a look out for the review soon now on to reading my interview with Lorhainne Eckhart.
 
Phoebe Jordan: When did you know that writing romance was going to be the thing that you would do with your life? Which author inspired you to start writing romance?

Lorhainne Eckhart: I love the romance genre, like so many others for the happy ending. For years I had a desire to write. But it wasn’t until about five years ago that I had the desire to write romance and was inspired to write my first novel. After I started I knew this is what I wanted to do with my life. So I refused to give up. It was two authors who inspired me to start writing. The first is Debbie Macomber who inspired me to start writing romance. Her story of sitting at the kitchen table and the kids at school typing her novel on an old typewriter. The second was Stephen King in his novel On Writing. His story of how he pursued writing for years before he was published.


Phoebe: Did you know what type of romance you wanted to write about or did you experiment with different genres before you chose the one that you felt was for you?


Lorhainne: I knew the story I would write about regardless of the genre. The Captain’s Lady came to me in a dream. It is just happens to fall into the genre, Contemporary military romance. When I write a story, it’s the story that comes to me regardless of the genre.


Phoebe: What was the first fiction you ever wrote? And do you still have it with you?


Lorhainne: The first fiction I ever wrote was in grade two, a ghost story. I gave it to my teacher. I gave it to my teacher. And I never saw it again.


Phoebe: How much research do you have to do for your novels and does it take you a long time to gather that research?


Lorhainne: I do a lot of research. So I have a clear understanding of what I am writing about. For the Captain’s Lady it was hundreds of hours to research the information. And I read everything, from Navy rules and regulations, life on-board a US Navy Ship. The layout of a ship, terminology, the setting, Military non-fiction and fiction, just to name a few. And of all that research I ma only use one line in a scene, but for me it is having an understanding of how this would play out. It may be a fictional story, but accuracy of facts in any novel are important to me.


Phoebe: How did you come up with the concept for your debut novel, The Captain’s Lady?


Lorhainne: Well as I mentioned before, the concept of Abby being rescued and lying on the deck of the ship, came to me in a dream. As I sat down to write the story, it was the research that much of the rest unfolded, her abduction, the malicious sexual assault charge against Captain Hamilton. All the twists and turns of the novel grew out of that one scene and the research.


Phoebe: How do you come up with each of your characters for your novels? How do you choose their names out of so many names out there?


Lorhainne: I choose names based on their personality. The names generally just come to me. There have been a few I’ve had to change the name as he just wasn’t a Harry for example. I will research as well if they are from a particular part of the country what the common names are in that area.


Phoebe: Do you have a favorite character that you really enjoyed writing about in your debut novel, The Captain’s Lady? Did you have a character that you felt you could really relate to in your debut novel, The Captain’s Lady?


Lorhainne: I really liked Captain Eric Hamilton. He is such a complex man. Many facets of a personality that stem out of such deep rooted pain. But he has such strong convictions that he is not afraid to voice, nor is afraid to make a stand. He is truly a man. There were several characters I could relate to, some aspects of Abby, Mary-Jo (I really liked her), Joan (The JAG Commander).


Phoebe: Do you have a process of how you start to write your novels?


Lorhainne: I just start writing from that idea I come up with. And I allow the story to unfold from there. I do not outline a novel.


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Interview with Minnette Meador

 

Minnette Meador
Minnette Meador
Romance author Minnette Meador will be interviewed on Tuesday, September 1 on Talk About My Favorite Authors. So keep coming back to find an excerpt of the interview posted here.

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Interview with Michelle Lauren

 

Michelle Lauren
Michelle Lauren
Romance author Michelle Lauren will be interviewed on Tuesday, September 8 on Talk About My Favorite Authors. So keep coming back to find an excerpt of the interview posted here.

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Interview with Wendy Ely

 

Wendy Ely
Wendy Ely
Romance author Wendy Ely will be interviewed on Tuesday, September 15 on Talk About My Favorite Authors. So keep coming back to find an excerpt of the interview posted here.

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Interview with Linda Palmer

 

Linda Palmer
Linda Palmer
Romance author Linda Palmer will be interviewed on Tuesday, September 21 on Talk About My Favorite Authors. So keep coming back to find an excerpt of the interview posted here.

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